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Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Page history last edited by Gayla S. Keesee 11 years, 8 months ago

What is the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) in Higher Education?

Kathleen McKinney, Cross Endowed Chair in the Scholarship in Teaching and Learning

Illinois State University

 

  • At Illinois State University, we have agreed to conceptualize SoTL as “systematic reflection on teaching and learning made public.”
  • In work at the Carnegie Foundation, the following definition has been used: “problem posing about an issue of teaching or learning, study of the problem through methods appropriate to the disciplinary epistemologies, applications of results to practice, communication of results, self-reflection, and peer review” (Cambridge, 2001).
  • Kreber and Cranton (2000) view SoTL as “ongoing learning about teaching and the demonstration of such knowledge.”
  • While Richlin (2001) argues, “The scholarship part of the process involves composing selected portions of the investigation and findings [or integration or reflection] into a manuscript to be submitted to an appropriate journal or conference venue.”
  • Martin, Benjamin, Prosser, and Trigwell (1999) argue that the scholarship of teaching is three related activities: engagement with the existing knowledge on teaching and learning, self-reflection on teaching and learning in ones discipline, and public sharing of ideas about teaching and learning within the discipline.
  • Pat Hutchings (2002), senior scholar at the Carnegie Foundation, reminds us that SoTL builds on many past traditions in higher education including classroom and program assessment, K-12 action research, the reflective practice movement, peer review of teaching, traditional educational research, and faculty development efforts to enhance teaching and learning.

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